Tuesday, December 27, 2011

MASS BIRD DIE-OFF: Over 30 Birds Mysteriously Die on Montgomery County Road, Mount Sterling, Kentucky - State Officials Are Mystified?!

There's a bizarre scene in Montgomery County where dozens of birds are dead.

More than 30 birds are lying dead on Indian Mound Drive at the intersection of Grassy Lick Road in Mt. Sterling.

All the birds appear to be the same species, and seem to have died and landed at this spot all at once.

No word yet about what caused their death.

The strange sight was first spotted on Christmas morning by people who live nearby.

"Yesterday morning around 9:30 a.m. I pulled out on to the bypass, and there was a whole slew of birds," explains local resident Karen Williams. "I didn't know where they came from. I didn't know. I thought if someone shot them there was an awful lot of shooting going on but I don't know," said Williams.

State wildlife officials tell LEX18 they expect the birds to be removed on Tuesday. - LEX18.
WATCH: Mass bird die-off in Kentucky.




CELESTIAL CONVERGENCE: Monumental Solar System Changes - Storm on Planet Saturn Goes Wild, Lasts More Than A Year, Shatters 1903 Record!

With over a year of intense, hissing convection, the storm on planet Saturn holds the record as the longest-lasting Saturn-encircling storm ever. Shown here in an amazing image, collected by NASA's Cassini spacecraft, it encircles the planet, and breaks a record set by a 1903 storm which battered the ringed celestial object for five months.

It is one of the largest and longest lived storms ever recorded in our Solar System. First seen late last year, the above cloud formation in the northern hemisphere of Saturn started larger than the Earth and soon spread completely around the planet. The storm has been tracked not only from Earth but from up close by the robotic Cassini spacecraft currently orbiting Saturn. Pictured above in false colored infrared in February, orange colors indicate clouds deep in the atmosphere, while light colors highlight clouds higher up. The rings of Saturn are seen nearly edge-on as the thin blue horizontal line. The warped dark bands are the shadows of the rings cast onto the cloud tops by the Sun to the upper left. A source of radio noise from lightning, the intense storm may relate to seasonal changes as spring slowly emerges in the north of Saturn. - NASA APOD.


WORLD WAR III: Countdown to Armageddon - Iran Threatens to Close the Strait of Hormuz, Gulf of Oman, and Gulf of Aden as 10-Day Naval Exercises Continues in the Country's Southern Waters Under the Noses of the United States Navy!

The ongoing naval drills in Iran's southern waters should be seen as a serious warning to the West about potential closure of the Strait of Hormuz, the semi-official Fars news agency quoted a senior Iranian lawmaker as saying on Monday.

"These wargames are a warning to the Western countries about the closure of the Strait of Hormuz," member of the parliament's National Security and Foreign Policy Commission Zohreh Elahian told Fars. "If any threat is posed to Iran, the Islamic Republic is capable of closing the Strait of Hormuz," Elahian said. "The naval drills in the Persian Gulf and the Sea of Oman display the power and domination of the Islamic Republic of Iran's Navy over the regional waters," she added. "The wargames are related to the power of deterrence, dominance and superiority over the region and are a symbol of the defensive and deterrence power of the Islamic republic's ruling system and Armed Forces," said the lawmaker. "The enforcement of the decision to close of the Strait of Hormuz is certainly within Iran's armed forces' capability," semi-official ILNA labour news agency cited Iranian Navy commander Habibollah Sayyari as saying last week."But such a decision should be made by the country's top authorities."


"Displaying Iran's defensive and deterrent power as well as relaying a message of peace and friendship in the Strait of Hormuz and the free waters are the main objectives of the drill," Sayyari said. "It will also display the country's power to control the region as well as testing new missiles, torpedoes and weapons," Sayyari said. The Iranian Navy launched the 10-day massive naval exercises, dubbed "Velayat 90" in the international waters on Saturday as the tension between the West and Iran is running high over the later's nuclear programme. Different classes of submarines, including Tareq and Ghadir, the newest ground-to-sea missile systems and torpedoes will be employed in the maneuvers. It is the first time the Iranian Navy carries out naval drills in such a vast area, covering an area of 2,000 km stretching from the east of the Strait of Hormuz in the Persian Gulf to the Gulf of Aden, Sayyari said.


The Western countries have long blamed Iran over its nuclear programme but Iran has argued that its nuclear programme is only for peaceful purposes. Iran's archrivals, the U.S. and Israel, have not ruled out the use of force against Iran over its nuclear issue. Iranian officials has constantly reaffirmed that Iran would respond to any attacks targeting their country. Earlier this month, Parviz Sorouri, a member of the Iranian Majlis National Security and Foreign Policy Commission, said that Iran plans to practice its ability to close the Strait of Hormuz, one of the world's most important passages for exports of crude oil and oil products from littoral states of the Persian Gulf. Iran's Foreign Ministry spokesman Ramin Mehmanparast said later that closing the Strait of Hormuz is not on Iran's agenda since Iran believes in upholding the stability and peace of the region. - China.org.
Iran began 10 days of naval exercises in the Strait of Hormuz on Saturday, raising concerns about a possible closure of the world's most strategic oil transit channel in the event of any outbreak of military conflict between Tehran and the West. The military drill, dubbed 'Velayat-e 90,' comes as the tension between the West and Iran is escalating over the Islamic state's nuclear programme.


Some analysts and diplomats believe the Islamic Republic could try to block the strait in the event of any war with the West over suspicions it is seeking atom bombs. Iran's arch-foes Israel and the United States have not ruled out military action if diplomacy and sanctions fail to rein in Iran's nuclear work. Iran says it wants nuclear energy only for peaceful ends. 'The enforcement of the decision to close of the Strait of Hormuz is certainly within Iran's armed forces' capability, but such a decision should be made by the country's top authorities,' Iranian Navy commander Habibollah Sayyari was quoted as saying by the semi-official ILNA labour news agency. - Daily Mail.
WATCH: Iran flex military muscle in strategic naval exercises.


WATCH: Iran begins 10-day military drills in Strait of Hormuz


THE GREAT DELUGE: Death Toll Mounts From Storm in Philippines - Bodies Found Far Away From Ravaged Villages, Coastline! UPDATE: More Rain Forecast as Death Toll From Storm in Philippines Tops 1,400!


The death toll from the tropical storm that lashed the southern Philippines just over a week ago has topped 1,200, the government said Monday, as the bodies of people swept out to sea by flash floods wash ashore.

The number of dead has increased to 1,249 from 1,100 over the weekend, said Major Reynaldo Balido, the military assistant for operations at the Office of Civil Defense. The bodies have been washed up on nearby beaches and islands, Balido said by telephone from the island of Mindanao, the scene of the worst devastation. The authorities have also enlisted the help of local fishermen to help search for the scores of people who remain missing, he said, adding that the fisherman volunteered, since many of them had lost friends and relatives in the disaster. The unusually heavy rains of Tropical Storm Washi, which churned across the southern Philippines between December 16 and 18, set off landslides and flash floods that swept away whole villages.


"I've gone through many disasters but this one is the worst as some of the survivors have lost so many family members," said Richard Gordon, chairman of the Philippine Red Cross. "Some have lost as many as 30 relatives," he said in comments posted recently on the organization's website. The number of people injured as a result of the storm has more than doubled to 4,594 from 1,979 at the weekend, the Philippine National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council said in a statement on its website, putting more pressure on already stretched relief agencies. The United Nations said last week that the storm has created "huge" humanitarian needs in the region. It has made an appeal to raise $28 million to deal with the immediate problems, with tens of thousands of people displaced in and around the port cities of Iligan and Cagayan de Oro. Many people are lacking food, shelter and clean drinking water, the United Nations said. The storm, known locally as Sendong, has affected nearly 700,000 people in the region, about 370,000 of whom are being helped at evacuation centers, the disaster council said Monday. An estimated 1,079 people remain missing in the chaotic aftermath of the storm, according to the council. It said that total is subject to further verification. President Benigno Aquino of the Philippines has declared a state of national calamity following the storm. - CNN.
Fishermen joined Philippine navy sailors, police and firefighters in an ever wider search for bodies from entire villages swept away in one of the country's worst flash floods. More bodies have washed ashore, pushing the death toll to more than 1,200, an official said Monday. While more than 60,000 homeless from hundreds of flood-ravaged villages spent a miserable Christmas in jam-packed schools and gymnasiums, search teams retrieved an additional 150 bodies from the sea as far as 60 miles (100 kilometers) from worst-hit Cagayan de Oro and Iligan cities, said Benito Ramos, head of the Office of Civil Defense. He said it would take three to six months to restore some normalcy and construct temporary housing to free up schools that are now serving as refugee camps. The death toll as of Monday stood at 1,236, with about two-thirds of the bodies unidentified. With more bodies found floating farther away, Ramos said authorities sought the help of fishermen to scour the sea. "We've stopped counting the missing. There are no accurate figures," Ramos said. "Those recovered, we don't know who they are. We have a system in place so that families can claim them later, based on fingerprints and dental records." The United Nations last week launched an urgent appeal for $28 million to help an estimated 600,000 affected people, more than half the population of Cagayan de Oro and Iligan in the southern Mindanao region.


Despite warnings from forecasters, most were asleep Dec. 16 when a tropical storm made a landfall in a region rarely visited by typhoons. It unleashed more than a month's worth of rainfall in 12 hours, sending walls of water gushing into homes. Many of the dead were women and children who drowned in their beds. Others scrambled to climb roofs to escape the overflowing rivers and muddy waters that carried dangerous debris and logs from nearby mountains. The logs were still floating off the coast. President Benigno Aquino III, who banned logging in February following previous flooding deaths that experts say were caused partly by deforestation and soil erosion, has ordered an investigation. Communist guerrillas in the south canceled Monday's celebration of their movement's 43rd founding anniversary and instead promised to donate money to flood victims and punish multinational companies they accuse of environmental destruction. Rebel spokesman Jorge Madlos told The Associated Press by telephone that they sought funds for victims from huge pineapple and banana plantations and other companies.


"Some were lukewarm to our call," Madlos said. "That'll be a factor when we decide which ones to punish first for this destruction." Another factor in the staggering death toll was illegal settlements along Cagayan rivers. Thousands of people lived in shanties on the banks and islands directly along the water's path. In the evacuation centers, where about a third of the displaced are children, aid workers were providing food, clothes, blankets, bottled water and hygiene kits. A lack of running water was still a major concern. Many shelters had poor sanitation with open drainage and defecation sites, said Ariel Balofinos, Mindanao manager for Save the Children aid agency. "Children in particular are susceptible to health threats because immune systems are weak," he said, adding that many youngsters were also traumatized. "Many children have witnessed friends and family dying. We've come across children who have been orphaned, but the good thing is they have relatives, which is part of the Filipino coping mechanism," he said. - Huffington Post.
WATCH: Mass Burials After Philippines Floods.




UPDATE: More Rain Forecast as Death Toll From Storm in Philippines Tops 1,400!
The Philippine government said Tuesday that fresh rain in Visayas and Mindanao could set off flash floods and landslides, bringing the potential for more misery in places already struggling to recover from a tropical storm that has killed more than 1,400 people. Eastern Luzon will experience cloudy skies with scattered rain, while the rest of the island will have mostly cloudy skies with light rain, the Philippine National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) predicted. The forecast was released on the same day that the government said the death toll from the tropical storm that lashed the southern Philippines more than a week ago has increased to 1,453 from 1,249 a day before. "Numbers will continue to rise, unfortunately, as we continue to retrieve more bodies," Benito Ramos, head of the NDRRMC, said Tuesday.

The bodies of people swept out to sea by flash floods from the storm have washed up on nearby beaches and islands, Maj. Reynaldo Balido, the military assistant for operations at the Office of Civil Defense, said Monday. The authorities have enlisted the help of local fishermen to help the continuing search and rescue efforts for the scores of people who remain missing, Balido said by telephone from the island of Mindanao, the scene of the worst devastation. He added that the fishermen volunteered, since many of them had lost friends and relatives in the disaster.

The unusually heavy rains of Tropical Storm Washi, which churned across the southern Philippines between December 16 and 18, resulted in landslides and flash floods that swept away whole villages. The authorities have had to carry out mass burials in order to deal with the large numbers of dead. "I've gone through many disasters but this one is the worst as some of the survivors have lost so many family members," said Richard Gordon, chairman of the Philippine Red Cross. "Some have lost as many as 30 relatives," he said in comments posted recently on the organization's website. The number of people injured as a result of the storm has more than doubled to 4,594 from 1,979 at the weekend, according to the NDRRMC, putting more pressure on already stretched relief agencies.

The United Nations said last week that the storm has created "huge" humanitarian needs in the region. It has made an appeal to raise $28 million to deal with the immediate problems, with tens of thousands of people displaced in and around the port cities of Iligan and Cagayan de Oro. Many people are lacking food, shelter and clean drinking water, the United Nations said. "We have also established make-shift camps and relief centers for victims in local schools in the area, but because schools are opening on January 3, we are looking to find them more permanent shelter," Ramos of the NDRRMC said. The storm, known locally as Sendong, has affected more than 700,000 people in the region, the NDRRMC estimated Tuesday. President Benigno Aquino of the Philippines has declared a state of national calamity following the storm. - CNN.
WATCH: CNN looks at effect of the floods on children.


WATCH: Hundreds still missing after Philippines typhoon.


EXTREME WEATHER: Severe Earth Changes in Australia - Tropical Cyclone Grant Derails Train, Injuring Two in Darwin; Southeast Queensland, Brisbane and Gold Coast on Storm Alert as Insurance Companies Estimate the Damage to Reach the "Tens of Millions"!

Take a look at the following stories, courtesy of Yahoo Australia on the continuing wild weather in Australia.

Two injured after train derails in cyclone flooding South of Darwin.

Two men have been injured after they were trapped in a freight train that was swept off a bridge near Katherine, south of Darwin. The 20-carriage train derailed near the Edith Falls River Crossing in floodwaters caused by ex-Tropical Cyclone Grant. Heavy rain from the system, which is , has brought heavy rain and isolated flooding to the Northern Territory, cutting sections of the Stuart Highway. Hundreds of local residents have also been stranded. Are you in a flood-affected area in the NT?

Police say the train's driver and co-driver have been rescued by emergency workers. One of the men has been airlifted to hospital with back injuries. Earlier, a CareFlight helicopter attempted to rescue the men but had to return to Darwin because it was unable to land in the wet conditions. Member for Katherine, Willem Westra Van Holthe, says the Edith River Bridge has collapsed and carriages are floating downstream. "It's what I'd describe as a scene of devastation here," he said. "Apart from the enormous amount of water flowing across the road, there's sheets of bitumen that have been lifted off and carried away and also it appears as though the train tried to get across this morning while the river has flooded. - Yahoo Australia.
Meanwhile, insurance companies are recalling staff from holidays to cope with the volume of calls from policyholders affected by severe storms that hit Melbourne on Christmas Day.
Thousands of homes, mainly in Melbourne's north, were damaged when storms swept across the city. The Insurance Council of Australia says companies already have received 5,000 calls and are expecting several thousand more. Some residents have been told they will have to wait on the phone for several hours to speak to claims staff. ICA spokesman Campbell Fuller says insurance companies are doing the best they can to respond to the demand. "What we suggest is if your enquiry is not urgent, if it is for instance minor damage to your car, perhaps hold off for a couple of days and let those people with urgent claims get through," Mr Fuller said.

Mr Fuller says the industry expects up to 10,000 claims to be made, with the damage bill likely to run into the tens of millions of dollars. He expects calls to insurers will continue in the coming weeks as people return from holidays to find their homes damaged. But some Victorians may not be covered if insurers decide that damage was caused by floodwaters. Lawyer Michael Bates says most people would be covered for hail and storm damage, but some may not be covered for flood damage. - Yahoo Australia.
To make matters worst, residents of Brisbane and the Gold Coast are bracing for a severe thunderstorm, with predictions of damaging winds and hail to lash the region.
The Bureau of Meteorology said thunderstorms had been detected near Coolangatta about 2.25pm (AEST) on Tuesday. The storms were headed northeast, with Beenleigh, Macleay Island and Victoria Point expected to be hit by 2.55pm, and Amity Point and Mud Island by 3.25pm. A statement on the bureau's website warned of damaging winds and large hailstones across Brisbane and the Gold Coast. Emergency Management Queensland advised residents to move their cars under cover, secure loose outdoor items, seek shelter and avoid using their phones during storms. A more general severe thunderstorm warning is also in place for parts of the central coast, Whitsundays and southeast coast. - Yahoo Australia.


MONUMENTAL EARTH CHANGES: Floods, Heat, and Migration - How Extreme Weather Will Transform Cities!

"Entire countries could be irrevocably damaged in certain parts of the world, and their inhabitants will have to find somewhere else to live."

When Tropical Storm Washi ripped through the southern Philippine city of Cagayan de Oro last weekend, it dumped in one day more than the city's entire average rainfall for the month of December. According to the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration, a total of 181 millimeters of rainfall was recorded in the area last Friday, compared to the expected 99.9 millimeters for the whole month. The devastating flash floods, which have so far claimed the lives of more than 1,000 people, arrived just weeks after a report from the UK's Met Office Hadley Centre for Climate Change indicated that climate change has significantly increased the number of people at risk from flooding globally. The report, "Climate: Observations, projections and impacts," examined how climate change will modify the weather in 24 countries around the world. While findings vary from region to region, it forecasts an overall increase in this century of coastal and river floods, extreme weather events and a global temperature rise of between 3-5C, if emissions are left unchecked. According to climate change experts, cities from New York in the U.S. to Dhaka in Bangladesh are likely to be heavily affected.

Simon Reddy, executive director of the C40 Cities network, which promotes sustainable development among local city authorities around the world says this could be a catalyst for migration into urban areas. "If the forecast temperature rise is accurate, then entire countries could be irrevocably damaged in certain parts of the world -- and their inhabitants will have to find somewhere else to live," he said. To illustrate his point, Reddy says that a third of flood-prone Bangladesh, in South Asia, could be made uninhabitable by a two-foot (60 cm) rise in regional sea-levels. The Met Office report echoes this point, predicting that climate change will subject an additional five million people in Bangladesh to floods, if they continue to live in the same place. "Where are they going to go?" said Reddy. "In most cases they'll move to where the opportunities and the jobs are -- the nearest habitable city." With 70% of the world's population expected to live in cities by 2050, according to figures from the U.N., the impact of climate change on the urban environment is more prescient than ever before.

Historically, cities built up around water highways and coastal regions have flourished due to their association with maritime trade and transport, said Jan Corfee-Morlot, senior climate change analyst for the OECD. "This means that a disproportionately high number of the world's cities are located in areas that are now increasingly at risk of floods," she added. According to Morlot, recent risk studies from the OECD as well as the newly published data from the Met Office report predict that extreme "once-in-a-lifetime" weather events such as flash floods and coastal hurricanes are going to become significantly more commonplace. But, she says, it's not just cities in the developing world that are ill-equipped to manage the problem. "In America alone -- New York, Miami, New Orleans -- these cities face terrible exposure to floods, and unlike cities such as Rotterdam (in the Netherlands) -- they do not have the defenses to prevent them." In the future, Morlot believes that major cities will have to adapt to the reality of regular flooding by building new infrastructure, such as vast flood barriers and "evacuation avenues" -- wide roads with dedicated lanes for emergency vehicles.

Global temperatures are projected to rise by between three to five degrees over the next century, according to the Met Office. Dr David Dodman, senior researcher at the International Institute for Environment and Development, says that temperatures in the city will far exceed that, due to a phenomenon known as the "urban heat island effect. The built environment tends to absorb heat during the day and release it slowly at night, so there's little opportunity for the city to cool down" he said. "This means that temperature rises from climate change will be significantly exaggerated in urban areas." Aside from increased instances of heat-related deaths, particularly among the elderly population, Dodman says that the "wicked irony" of the urban heat island effect is that it stimulates a demand for air conditioning. "In places like Delhi, we're seeing a growing middle class use their wealth to pay for electricity-hungry air-conditioning units, which contribute to global warming, and this of course creates a negative feedback loop."

According to Dodman, the predicted rise in global sea levels pose a threat to city aquifers -- underground wells that provide a source of fresh water for many urban settlements around the world. "In coastal cities, the rise causes 'saline intrusion' -- where salty water gets into the fresh water aquifers, making it undrinkable" he says. In addition, Dr Doug Crawford-Brown, executive director at Cambridge University's Centre for Climate Mitigation Research, anticipates that stock piles of bottled water will be have to be rationed when fresh water distribution systems buckle under the impact of city floods. "Even in a developed city like London, which is very well protected by the Thames barrier, high intensity rainfall could create problems with the old sewage system -- causing the potential spread of microbial disease," he said.

Simon Reddy believes that urbanities of the future will be defined "not just by how they restrict their own contributions to climate change, but by the infrastructure and policies they employ to defend against the consequences of it." To this end, Reddy says that many of the cities in the C40 network have already started to implement adaptive measures. "In Seoul, for instance, they have removed a highway and restored an ancient river running through the city. This creates a wind corridor to it keep cool, and will also help drain water away in times of high rainfall," he said. Meanwhile, New York and Tokyo have led the way with green rooftops and urban gardens. "Urban green spaces are going to be more critical than (they have) ever been," he said. "Not only do they absorb heat and rainfall -- helping to keep cities cool and dry, but they provide opportunities for small scale food cultivation -- so city dwellers can become a little less dependent on imports." For Matthew Kahn, economics professor at the UCLA's Environment Institute, the accelerated urbanization caused by climate change, will mean that for most cities, the only way is up. The professor, whose book "Climatopolis" details how future cities could turn climate change to their advantage, says that he expects future modern cities to accommodate the flood of migrants by building energy efficient high-rise residential tower blocks, over small areas of land -- "much like we see in Singapore today," he said. - CNN.



GLOBAL VOLCANISM: Mount Lokon Volcano Erupts in Indonesia, Spewing Out Massive Clouds of Ash - Causing Widespread Panic to Villagers!

One of Indonesia’s most active volcanoes erupted Tuesday, spewing clouds of ash and panicking villagers but no evacuation has been ordered so far, a government volcanologist said.

Mount Lokon erupts as seen from Tomohon, North Sulawesi, Indonesia, in July this year.
The first eruption at Mount Lokon was at 3:07 am (1907 GMT Monday), followed by two more bursts within minutes, Farid Bina told AFP from a monitoring post near the volcano on Sulawesi island. “The eruption was heard as far as five kilometres (three miles) away, causing panic among villagers living close to the volcano,” he said, adding that winds blew volcanic ash to villages up to five kilometres to the east and northeast. “Two villages with about 10,000 people each have been affected by the ash, which stopped later in the morning,” he added.More than 5,200 people were evacuated to temporary shelters when the 1,580-metre volcano erupted in July, sending huge clouds of ash as high as 3,500 metres (11,500 feet) into the sky. Lokon’s last deadly eruption was in 1991, killing a Swiss tourist. The Indonesian archipelago has dozens of active volcanoes and straddles major tectonic fault lines known as the “Ring of Fire” between the Pacific and Indian oceans. The country’s most active volcano, Mount Merapi in central Java, killed more than 350 people in a series of violent eruptions last year. - Jakarta Globe.
More than 30,000 people live near the volcano, according to the local government.
One of Indonesia's most active volcanoes erupted Tuesday, spewing clouds of ash and panicking villagers but no evacuation has been ordered so far, a government vulcanologist said. The first eruption at Mount Lokon was just after 3am in the morning, followed by two more bursts within minutes, Farid Bina. told AFP from a monitoring post near the volcano on Sulawesi island. “The eruption was heard as far as five kilometres (three miles) away, causing panic among villagers living close to the volcano,” he said, adding that winds blew volcanic ash to villages up to five kilometres to the east and northeast.

“Two villages with about 10,000 people each have been affected by the ash, which stopped later in the morning,” he added. More than 5,200 people were evacuated to temporary shelters when the 1580-metre volcano erupted in July, sending huge clouds of ash as high as 3500 metres (11 500 feet) into the sky. Lokon's last deadly eruption was in 1991, killing a Swiss tourist. The Indonesian archipelago has dozens of active volcanoes and straddles major tectonic fault lines known as the “Ring of Fire” between the Pacific and Indian oceans. The country's most active volcano, Mount Merapi in central Java, killed more than 350 people in a series of violent eruptions last year. - IOL.


MYSTERY: Symbols of an Alien Sky, Man-Made or Natural Phenomena - The Latest UFO Sightings And Aerial Anomalies Around the World?!

Here are several of the latest unidentified flying objects (UFOs) seen recently across the globe.

These videos of mysterious lights were recorded in Russia on Friday, the 23rd of December, 2011 by 5 different witnesses in 5 different locations.

WATCH: Mysterious lights filmed over Russia.


New video of several bright unknown objects flying in formation over Yekaterinburg in Russia on Saturday, the 24th of December, 2011.

WATCH: UFO fleet over Yekaterinburg.


This footage of bright lights in a triangle formation was recorded in the night skies near Delray Beach in Florida on Sunday, the 25th of December, 2011.

WATCH: Triangle formation over Delray Beach


This daytime footage of unidentified flying objects or spheres hovering in the skies above Tijuana in Mexico was recorded on Christmas day - Sunday, the 25th of December, 2011.

WATCH: Daytime UFO activity over Tijuana.



This footage of unknown bright objects was recorded in the night skies above Sueno Park in Phoenix, Arizona on Thursday, the 22nd of December, 2011.

WATCH: Unknown lights over Phoenix.


MUFON Case 34335 of unknown lights/orbs filmed over Cedar Hills in Utah on December 24th, 2011.

WATCH: UFO/Orbs over Utah.


This video of unknown lights flying across the night skies over Moscow in Russia was recorded on Sunday, the 25th of December, 2011.

WATCH: UFO fleet filmed over Moscow.




MASS ANIMAL DIE-OFF: EXTINCTION LEVEL EVENT - Russia's Siberian Tigers Face Extinction, the Sub-species of Tiger Could Be Gone By 2022 as Population Plummets!


Worldwide tiger populations have plummeted from 100,000 a century ago to less than 7,000 today.

According to the World Wildlife Fund, tigers could be extinct in the wild within a decade.

The Siberian or Amur Tiger is one of the rarest in the world, with only around 500 left in the wild in Russia. But poaching, disease, and habitat loss from intensive logging and development continues to threaten populations.

WATCH: Al Jazeera's Robin Forestier-Walker reports.


PLANETARY TREMORS: 4.2 Magnitude Earthquake Strikes Southern Egypt - The First Major Tremor to Hit the Country Over the Last Few Decades!

An earthquake measuring 4.2 has occurred in southern Egypt.

According to the National Institute of Astronomical and Geophysical Research, tremors were reported on Monday evening near Lake Nasser, south of Aswan. The population of the High Dam city barely noticed the quake, however, the tremors were felt by people in the desert regions, several tens of kilometers south of Aswan.

According to scientists, the epicenter was located at a depth of two kilometers. This area was once considered a seismically hazardous area, but over the last few decades there had not been a single tremor. - Voice of Russia.