Thursday, June 9, 2011

PLANETARY TREMORS: 4.5 Quake Strikes Baja California, Mexico!


(Click on image for larger view.)
In a earlier post, today,  I told you about the discovery of a active fault in California, that could produce a major earthquake in the American state. Several minutes ago, a magnitude 4.5 earthquake struck Baja California, Mexico at a depth of just 2.3 kilometres (km) or 1.4 miles, the quake hit at 15:22:11 UTC Thursday 9th June 2011 and was located at 32.615°N, 115.742°W. The epicentre was 20 km or 13 miles southwest from Seeley; 24 km or 15 miles  southwest from Heber; 24 km southwest from Calexico; 26 km or 16 miles southwest from El Centro; and 120 km 75 miles east from Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico. The latest news updates indicate that there are no reports of damage as yet. It should be noted at the time of posting, that according to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), a successive swarm of 17 earthquakes was recorded in the area over the last 24 hours.

Once again, I repeat the Eureka Alert report.

Fault lines along the San Francisco region.
Using a radar-like lasar imaging technology, known as LiDAR, scientists have identified a previously unrecognized active fault near the Martis Creek Dam just outside of Truckee, California, possibly representing a significant seismic risk to the greater Lake Tahoe area. Named after a 19th century town site that was located along the Truckee River, the Polaris Fault was identified during an evaluation by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which owns and operates Martis Creek Dam. The approximate 22-mile fault may yield an estimated maximum earthquake magnitude of 6.4 to 6.9.

The estimate could increase should the fault connect with, or rupture at the same time as, other faults in the area. LiDAR, the aerial mapping technology, emits laser pulses from an instrument mounted in an airplane. Some of these near vertical laser pulses penetrate dense vegetation, allowing for the vegetation to be removed in data processing to yield high-resolution images of the Earth's surface. LiDAR is especially useful for analyzing rugged, poorly accessible, forested terrain. "LiDAR Assisted Identification of an Active Fault near Truckee, California," by authors Lewis E. Hunter and Ronn S. Rose of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and James F. Howle and Gerald W. Bawden of the U.S. Geological Survey
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PLANETARY TREMORS: The Monster Chile Volcano changes Emerald Waters into an Ocean of Ash, as Lake is ruined from Volcanic Fallout!


To illustrate fully the repercussions of the Puyehue-Cordon Caulle volcano, have a look at following images of the dramatic change of the emerald waters of Lake Nahuel Huapi into an ocean of ash, ruined by the fallout after the monster volcano in Chile exploded into life.

Before the eruption of the Chilean volcano.
After the eruption of the Chilean volcano.
Just days ago tourists flocked to see the emerald waters of Chile's renowned Lake Nahuel Huapi - home to several species of trout which attract anglers from all over the world. Today the lake is covered with huge patches of black and brown ash from the Puyehue-Cordon Caulle volcano which exploded into life after decades of lying dormant in south-central Chile. Roads blanketed with volcanic pumice rocks and stones near the Cardenal Samore border pass between Argentina and Chile were inspected by police officers wearing masks for protection against toxic gases. Just over the border in Argentina thick abrasive soot was coating slopes in a string of resorts in San Carlos de Bariloche that depend on the winter ski season which opens in less than two weeks.

Around 4,000 people have already been evacuated from 22 communities since Saturday's eruption belched a cloud more than six miles high across the South American countries. Meanwhile, stiff winds blew the ash in a widening arc across Argentina to the capital Buenos Aires, grounding most air travel in and out of the country. Aerolineas Argentinas and Austral, the country's state-owned international and domestic airlines, cancelled all flights. At least six international carriers also suspended flights between Buenos Aires and cities in the U.S. Europe and South America. Flights from Chile over Argentine territory were also suspended. The capital's usually bustling international and domestic airports were nearly deserted. Geologists in Chile have said the volcano could keep erupting for several weeks.
- Daily Mail.

WEATHER ANOMALIES: Freak Tornado-Like Storm Rips Chile Town!


A freak tornado-like storm rip through Chile's town, Villarrica, injuring nine people.

Chileans can't seem to catch a break these days. Less than a week after Chile's Puyehue volcano erupted, forcing thousands to evacuate, a freak storm hit another part of the Andean nation, injuring nine. The tornado-like storm struck the town of Villarrica in southern Chile with winds of 75 to 110 miles...

Raw video footage captured the intense winds and rainfall, fallen trees and spiraling debris. Bewildered residents were also shown roaming through the damage the storm left in its wake. Roofs were torn off and property destroyed. Other pockets of the globe have been rattled with extreme weather this week, including Haiti, where heavy rain and flooding have killed at least 23.
- Time Newsfeed.
WATCH: Storm batters Chilean town.


EARTH CHANGES: Uncontrollable Fires leave Ghost Towns in Arizona!


"I've seen lots of fires, but nothing like this."

The raging forest fire in eastern Arizona that has already forced thousands from their homes is headed for a pair of transmission lines that supply electricity to hundreds of thousands of people as far east as Texas. The 607-square-mile blaze is expected to reach the power lines as early as Friday. If the lines are damaged, parts of New Mexico and Texas could face rolling blackouts. Meanwhile, an Arizona sheriff ordered remaining residents of two towns in the path of the wildfire to evacuate.

A massive wildfire heading from eastern Arizona toward New Mexico has closed national forests and parks, forced evacuations of mountain resort communities, and prompted air quality alerts in New Mexico, where smoke blanketed Santa Fe and disrupted flights into Albuquerque earlier this week. The Wallow blaze, which officials think was sparked by an unattended campground fire on May 29, now covers more than 600 square miles and is the second largest in Arizona history. At noon today, the popular Coronado National Forest is closing its nearly 2 million acres - including all roads, visitor centers, campgrounds, trails and picnic areas - in southeastern Arizona and parts of New Mexico. The Catalina or Mt. Lemmon Highway, which leads to the peak north of Tucson, will be open during daylight hours only. Saguaro National Park will close trails and land in its Rincon Mountain District on the eastern side of the park today, though the Rincon Mountain District Visitor Center will remain open. - USA Today.
Tucson's power company warned it may have to impose rolling blackouts if the giant fire in the eastern part of the state knocks out two big transmission lines that provide much of the city's energy supply. Tucson Electric said on its website the Wallow Fire in the White Mountains of eastern Arizona was threatening two 345-kilovolt (kV) lines and could reach the grasslands near its 1,200-megawatt Springerville coal-fired power plant. Even though Tucson is located away from the fire in south central Arizona about 200 miles southwest of Springerville, the power lines are one of the city's primary sources of energy. "The loss of those lines would interrupt delivery of enough energy to serve more than half of Tucson Electric's anticipated peak energy demand under current weather conditions," the utility said. - Reuters.
Fire crews worked through the night to protect several Arizona mountain communities from a growing forest fire that has forced thousands from their homes and threatens transmission lines that supply electricity as far east as Texas. The 607-square-mile blaze, the second largest ever in Arizona, is expected to reach the power lines as early as Friday. If the lines are damaged, hundreds of thousands in parts of New Mexico and Texas could face rolling blackouts. Meanwhile, crews were hopeful that they could slow the fire Thursday if weather predictions hold true. After days of driving winds, no high-wind warning issued. Officials spoke guardedly late Wednesday as they faced the 12th day of the fire fight. "Don't get complacent just because we don't have a red flag warning. Ten to 15 mph winds are good winds to drive fire, especially through grass, so we're going to have to be very careful," fire information officer Jim Whittington said. Residents remaining in Springerville and the neighboring community of Eagar were evacuated as a spot fire popped up on the northwestern edge of the larger blaze. That caused officials to worry about the prospect of the fire hooking around a bulldozer line and a burned-out area and racing toward town. Apache County sheriff's deputies and other law enforcement officers went house-to-house in Springerville looking for remaining residents. At Reed's Lodge along Springerville's main street Wednesday, Daric Knight made sure no embers landed on his wood shingles. Knight's family has owned the lodge for decades. "I've seen lots of fires, but nothing like this," he said. About 7,000 people live in Springerville, Eagar and surrounding areas, although many had left before the sheriff ordered the full evacuation. The blaze has blackened about 389,000 acres and destroyed 11 buildings, primarily in the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest. - Star Telegram.
WATCH: Wall of smoke and fire, raging wildfires leave 'ghost towns' in Arizona.


WATCH: Fires prompt home evacuations in Arizona as flames blaze out of control.


EARTH CHANGES: HEAT WAVE - Brutal Heat Hits Eastern America!


A brutal heat wave is setting in today, for the eastern states of America as record-shattering temperatures continue to climb.

Heat that has been building in the mid-South in recent weeks will bake the East through today. Intense June sunshine combined with building humidity and hot air will push AccuWeather RealFeel temperatures to dangerous levels during the midday and afternoon hours. Caution is always advised during hot, sunny days. However, extreme caution is urged due to the intensity of the heat, humidity and June sunshine. The heat will be hard on the very young, elderly and those who must work outdoors. Never leave children unattended in parked vehicles for any length of time. Heat can build to lethal levels in only a few minutes. While the heat will be nasty enough throughout the region, the large cities will have the worst of it as usual. Just as urban areas begin to cool down to reasonable levels during the early morning hours, the sun will already be rising on the next day, preparing to broil the cityscape all over again.

As temperatures climb into the 90s, it can affect train travel. Transit trains must slow down to compensate for slight buckling of the rails as they expand. The extreme heat can also cause some trains to break down. Temperatures will top 90 degrees from Burlington, Vt., southward to
Boston, Hartford and New York City. The heat already reached record levels in Newark, N.J. and in the Baltimore-Washington area during Wednesday afternoon. From near the Mason-Dixon Line on south today, the 100-degree mark could be challenged on I-95 city thermometers from Philadelphia and Wilmington, Del., to Baltimore, Washington, D.C., and Richmond. This heat wave has already been responsible for sending triple-digit heat into the nation's northern tier. The high in Minneapolis hit 103 degrees on Tuesday, shattering record high of 95 degrees from 2004. Not only was the record high shattered, this was the hottest temperature recorded in the Twin Cities since the thermometer hit 105 degrees on July 31, 1988. Although not the first heat wave of the season for the southern mid-Atlantic, it will bring the hottest weather so far this year for much of the East. Record highs set more than 75 years ago will be challenged during the heat wave, including in the major I-95 cities. The hottest it has been in Boston so far was 87 degrees; New York City reached 90 degrees and Washington, D.C. climbed to 98 degrees. All three cities and many others could eclipse this mark during the upcoming two days. - AccuWeather.
WATCH: Heat grips much of the United States.


THE DELUGE: China floods kill 52 people, Over 110,000 Evacuated,...!


Floods have killed 52 people and left 32 missing in China since the flood season started in June, a senior official said Wednesday, warning of more heavy rains.

Heavy rains have inundated parts of 12 provinces in central and southern China and affected 4.81 million people so far since the flood season arrived, Shu Qingpeng, deputy head of the Office of State Flood Control and Drought Relief Headquarters, told a Wednesday press conference. In the worst-hit southwestern province of Guizhou, floods have killed 21 people and left 32 missing in the past few days, forcing nearly 100,000 people to evacuate. More than 3,000 rescuers are working to locate the missing and fight the floods in the province's Wangmo County, where all the deaths and most of the missing were reported after downpours lashed the county Monday morning.  

The county recorded a maximum one-hour precipitation of 122.5 millimeters, the most in 200 years, Shu said. More than 45,000 people in Wangmo have been evacuated from their homes to escape the rising water. Food, coats, tents and quilts have been dispatched to the county. Chen Mingming, Party chief of the Qianxinan Buyi and Miao Autonomous Prefecture, which administers Wangmo, vowed Wednesday to spare no efforts to find the missing and ensure basic living for the evacuees. The Ministry of Finance (MOF) and Ministry of Civil Affairs on Wednesday allocated 35 million yuan (5.39 million U.S. dollars) to help flood relief. The MOF said in a statement on its website that the fund would be used to help relocate evacuees, provide temporary living assistance, reconstruct destroyed buildings and offer pensions to relatives of those who perished in the floods. Floods in the neighboring province of Jiangxi also forced more than 13,600 people to flee their homes. Since June, floods have destroyed 7,462 houses and submerged 255,000 hectares of farmland in China, incurring direct economic losses of 4.92 billion yuan (760 million U.S. dollars), Shu said. Heavy rainfalls have drenched the previously parched lower and middle parts of the Yangtze River basin, increasing water of rivers to alert levels in the provinces of Jiangxi, Hunan and Guizhou.

According to Shu, the rain has put an end to the persistent drought in the provinces of Jiangxi, Guizhou and Zhejiang. The drought in Hubei and Anhui has also been eased, but in the nearby province of Jiangsu, more rains are needed to provide relief. Thunder showers also hit the country's north Tuesday night. Two people were killed and one was injured by lightning in Beijing, where more than 1,000 thunder strikes were recorded late Tuesday and early Wednesday. In the northern province of Hebei, a wall collapsed in a rainstorm Tuesday evening, killing one passerby and wounding six others. According to Shu, southern China will be hit by more rain over the coming few days. He asked local authorities to closely monitor rainfall and water levels and warned of more floods, landslides and mountain torrents.
- Xinhuanet News.

WATCH: China floods kill 52 people, more rain forecast for the south.


GEOLOGICAL UPHEAVAL: Huge Landslide Blocks N. Dakota Roads!


Recent landslides have affected at least four roads in the North Dakota area and officials are formulating plans to remedy the issues.

About 30 feet of earth from Sentinel Butte hill sits atop a portion of the road which accesses the top of the hill. Golden Valley Emergency Manager Brenda Frieze said the vegetation on the portion of land that slid on top of the road stayed intact. "It just looks like that's the way it was, you know, for the last 200 years," she said with a laugh. "You just drive up to the hill and can't go any further." However, the road meandering out the other side of the hill shows it's a recently created landmark. The slide has cut off access to communication towers on top of Sentinel Butte hill, but Frieze said a four-wheeler could get a person there.

Golden Valley Road Foreman Pete Wirtzfeld said the easiest fix will likely be to relocate the road. Moving the road would likely cause more earth to move from as far as 100 feet up the steep slope, he added. "It's not a minor fix, it's a major one," Wirtzfeld said. Attempting to dig the road out may be dangerous, he added. "It's probably going to move from here on out very slowly and I am sure that there will be some settling that will occur as the moisture dissipates from that slide and it shrinks and it will continue to shift for a time," Wirtzfeld said. "I don't think it's going to be anything significant unless somebody gets to working in there and moving the material off the road. Then there will be a significant continuation of that slide." The details of who will help remedy the problem and when need to be worked out, he said. "We're just approaching it kind of cautiously, because we don't want to overstep our authority with landowners and what not and get everybody involved that has an interest up there," Wirtzfeld said.

"The county and the state has shared in the maintenance of that road in the past and we're not looking necessarily for the county to do it alone." A landslide has also taken a portion of Highway 85 near the Theodore Roosevelt National Park North Unit in McKenzie County from three lanes down to two. "Actually, the park's fence that goes along our right-of way is gone right there because the slide has taken it out," said Joe Wilt, assistant Williston District engineer for the North Dakota Department of Transportation. "But if you look at the rest of the park on that north hill, all over that park it's sliding." He expects the land to continue moving slightly, but said the highway is safe to drive on. Traffic headed north of Killdeer on Highway 22 is still being diverted to Highway 85 since two landslides caused enough damage to close the road about three weeks ago, said Larry Gangl, DOT Dickinson district engineer. "We're looking at the options for a bypass to repair that to get traffic going again," Gangl said. Highway 8 south of Twin Buttes was closed three weeks ago due to a landslide, he added, and they are putting in a bypass. Wilt does not expect to have to close Highway 85, but said if it does close, traffic will likely be diverted to Highway 16, which goes through Beach.
- Public Works Magazine.


PLANETARY TREMORS: New Fault found near Lake Tahoe, California!


Several days ago, I told you of a new fault that has been discovered in New Zealand, that could possibly produced a mega-earthquake in the already disaster-ravaged area of Christchurch. Geologists concluded that the previously unknown "complex arrangement of faults" in the bedrock under Canterbury was link to the 7.0-magnitude that hit Christchurch last year September.  Today, scientists have discovered an active fault in California, that could also produce a major earthquake in the American state.

Fault lines along the San Francisco region.
Using a radar-like lasar imaging technology, known as LiDAR, scientists have identified a previously unrecognized active fault near the Martis Creek Dam just outside of Truckee, California, possibly representing a significant seismic risk to the greater Lake Tahoe area. Named after a 19th century town site that was located along the Truckee River, the Polaris Fault was identified during an evaluation by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which owns and operates Martis Creek Dam. The approximate 22-mile fault may yield an estimated maximum earthquake magnitude of 6.4 to 6.9.

The estimate could increase should the fault connect with, or rupture at the same time as, other faults in the area. LiDAR, the aerial mapping technology, emits laser pulses from an instrument mounted in an airplane. Some of these near vertical laser pulses penetrate dense vegetation, allowing for the vegetation to be removed in data processing to yield high-resolution images of the Earth's surface. LiDAR is especially useful for analyzing rugged, poorly accessible, forested terrain. "LiDAR Assisted Identification of an Active Fault near Truckee, California," by authors Lewis E. Hunter and Ronn S. Rose of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and James F. Howle and Gerald W. Bawden of the U.S. Geological Survey.
- Eureka Alert.

EARTH CHANGES: Alaska Glacier Advances 10 Feet Per Day?!


According to the following report, the Alaskan glacier, the largest tidewater glacier is advancing at least 10 feet per day and could block the entrance to the Russell Fjord inlet that extends north to Disenchantment Bay, the terminus of Hubbard Glacier, at the head of Yakutat Bay.

Hubbard Glacier north of Yakutat crept to within 100 yards of
Gilbert Point in June of 2007. George Kalli of the US Army
Corp of Engineers took this photo in May 2007.
7 Jun 11 - "Haven't heard any news about the largest tidewater glacier in North America this year," says reader Phil Peterson. "I was able to check after not being able to access the site for many months." "Three months ago Hubbard glacier was about 410 meters away from Gilbert point, says Peterson. "It is now about 120 meters away from blocking the entrance to Russell Fjord." You won't hear this in the main stream media. (a large advancing glacier) Thanks for your website and all the info you provide! You are doing a great service for the country. Phil Peterson, Chalfont, PA.

Confirmed: Largest tidewater glacier in North America advancing 10 feet per day. After I received this email from Phil, I decided to check it out. Phil is absolutely correct. The largest tidewater glacier in North America is advancing 10 feet (3.1 meters) per day - and not a peep from the main-stream media. Three months ago Hubbard glacier was about 410 meters away from Gilbert point. It is now about 120 meters away - the length for a football field - from blocking the entrance to Russell Fjord. And it has been advancing for a long time.
Chart from US Army Cold Regions Research & Engineering Lab
- http://glacierresearch.org/ The measuring instruments are not at the
very edge of Gilbert Point. Therefore, when the glacier reaches the
red line on the chart, that's when it will close Russell Fjord.
According to the Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Hubbard Glacier has been thickening and advancing since scientists first measured it in 1895. It has also dammed Russell Fjord before. "After the glacier dammed the fiord in 1986, the new Russell Lake rose 83 feet above sea level before the ice-and-gravel dam broke," says science writer Ned Rozell. It damned it again in 2002.In 2002, Russell Lake reached 49 feet above sea level before the dam burst and the water rejoined the ocean with a flood 30 percent greater than the largest measured flow of the Mississippi River at Baton Rouge, says Rozell. In the photo at right, a narrow trickle of water flows from the channel between Hubbard Glacier (on left) and the base of Gilbert Point (right). Disenchantment Bay is in the foreground.

Could create a huge glacial lake. "'When' and 'if' the Hubbard Glacier eventually closes the Russell Fjord, the fjord will fill with fresh water, becoming a 30-mile-long lake creating a new 40,000-cubic-feet-per-second river system," says climatologist Cliff Harris. "This will have an extremely 'negative' economic impact on Yakutat and the surrounding regions."
This would be like a modern-day Glacial Lake Missoula, but on a smaller scale. According to the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the new Russell Lake would overtop at about 132 feet, whereas Glacial Lake Missoula filled to a depth of about 1100 feet and contained as much water as Lake Erie and Lake Ontario combined. So let me say it again. The largest tidewater glacier in North America is advancing 10 feet (3.1 meters) per day. At that rate it could close Russell Fjord this summer. And not a peep from the main-stream media.
- Ice Age Now.

EARTH CHANGES: Storm 'Adrian' becomes season's first Hurricane!


Hurricane Adrian is strengthening in the Eastern Pacific and could become a major hurricane, as maximum sustained winds for the first hurricane of the 2011 season increased early Thursday to about 90 mph or 144.83 kph.

Adrian was upgraded to a hurricane late Wednesday afternoon PDT. Since its upgrade it has steadily strengthened. As of 2am PDT Thursday maximum sustained winds were near 90 mph. Additional intensification is forecast today and tonight. Adrian is expected to become a major hurricane with winds 115 mph or higher tonight. As of 2am PDT the center of Hurricane Adrian was located 275 miles south-southwest of Zihuatanejo, Mexico and was moving toward the west-northwest at 12 mph. This general motion and speed should continue through Friday, that should keep the worst wind and rain well off shore. The tropical storm watch has been cancelled along the Mexican coast. Swells are already affecting the southwest coast of Mexico. Rip currents are also a threat. Showers and thunderstorms should increase along the central Mexican coast later today through the end of the week.

There is still a very weak area of low pressure in the northwest Caribbean to the southwest of the Cayman Islands. This low should not develop due to strong wind shear in the area. Locally heavy showers and thunderstorms continue in Cuba, Jamaica and Hispaniola. Flooding and mud slides will be a concern until the low lifts north of the area over the next couple of days. Showers and thunderstorms moved into the southern Bahamas from the low yesterday and should spread throughout the central and northern Bahamas today. Florida will also see an increase in shower and thunderstorm activity today.
Weather.  

WATCH: First Tropical Storm and Hurricane of the Season.



ALERT: The Sun - Geomagnetic Storms could cause Major Disruptions! Solar Storms could trigger Earthquakes & Volcanoes on planet Earth!


The U.S. National Weather Service (NWS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is warning of a geomagnetic storm emanating from the Sun, sometime on Wednesday, which may knock communications and grids in some locations.

An unusual solar flare observed by a NASA space observatory on Tuesday could cause some disruptions to satellite communications and power on Earth over the next day or so, officials said. The potent blast from the Sun unleashed a firestorm of radiation on a level not witnessed since 2006, and will probably lead to moderate geomagnetic storm activity by Wednesday, according to the U.S. National Weather Service. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured the spectacular event, a combination of a solar flare, a coronal mass ejection (CME) and a minor radiation storm. 'This one was rather dramatic,' said Bill Murtagh, programme co-ordinator at the NWS's Space Weather Prediction Centre, describing the M-2 (medium-sized) solar flare that peaked at 1:41 am Eastern time in the United States, or 0541 GMT on Monday. 'We saw the initial flare occurring and it wasn't that big but then the eruption associated with it -- we got energy particle radiation flowing in and we got a big coronal mass injection,' he said. 'You can see all the materials blasting up from the Sun so it is quite fantastic to look at.' NASA's solar dynamics observatory, which launched last year and provided the high-definition pictures and video of the event, described it as 'visually spectacular,' but noted that since the eruption was not pointed directly at Earth, the effects were expected to remain 'fairly small.'

'The large cloud of particles mushroomed up and fell back down looking as if it covered an area of almost half the solar surface,' said a NASA statement. Murtagh said space weather analysts were watching closely to see whether the event would cause any collision of magnetic fields between the Sun and Earth, some 93 million miles (150 million kilometres) apart. 'Part of our job here is to monitor and determine whether it is Earth-directed because essentially that material that is blasting out is gas with magnetic field combined,' he told AFP. 'In a day or so from now we are expecting some of that material to impact us here on Earth and create a geomagnetic storm,' he said. 'We don't expect it to be any kind of a real severe one but it could be kind of a moderate level storm.' The Space Weather Prediction Centre said the event is 'expected to cause G1 (minor) to G2 (moderate) levels of geomagnetic storm activity tomorrow, June 8, beginning around 1800 GMT.' Any geomagnetic storm activity will likely be over within 12-24 hours. 'The Solar Radiation Storm includes a significant contribution of high energy protons, the first such occurrence of an event of that type since December 2006,' the NWS said. As many as 12 satellites and spacecraft are monitoring the heliosphere, and one instrument in particular on board NASA's lunar reconnaissance orbiter is measuring radiation and its effects. 'Certainly over the (two-year) lifetime of the mission this is the most significant event,' said Harlan Spence, principal investigator for the cosmic ray telescope for the effects of radiation, or CRaTER. 'This is really exciting because ironically when we were developing the mission initially we thought we would be launching closer to a solar maximum when these big solar particle events typically occur,' Spence told AFP. 'Instead we launched into a historic solar minimum that took a long, long time to wake up,' he said. 'This is interesting and significant because it shows the Sun is returning to its more typical active state.'
- Daily Mail.

WATCH: Coronal Mass Ejections on June 6th, with M2-class Flare Alert!


WATCH: Massive Prominence Eruption on the Sun!


The Cosabio Virtual Institute is forecasting in the lastest Astrotometry report, that these solar storms could trigger earthquakes and volcanism on planet Earth, today, and over the next several days.

WATCH: Astrotometry Report: Earthquake and Volcano Watch!